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Kelsey Tubman

Phillips & Associates, PLLC - New York
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Kelsey Tubman
Phillips & Associates, PLLC - New York
New York,
 NY

Kelsey Tubman is a Litigator with Phillips & Associates. Ms. Tubman is committed to fighting for clients who have been wronged or discriminated against. If you believe you’ve been discriminated against by your employer because of your membership in a protected class, you should discuss your situation with Ms. Tubman and the dedicated New York City employment lawyers of Phillips & Associates. We work diligently to determine the best possible outcome for all our clients.

Ms. Tubman graduated from California State University, Chico in Chico, California with her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science - Legal Studies.

Ms. Tubman received her Juris Doctor Degree from American University Washington College of Law in Washington, D.C. While in law school, Ms. Tubman was a staff member and Senior Editor on the Criminal Law Practitioner Brief. She was also a student attorney at the Montgomery County State’s Attorney’s Office on the District Court Team and participated in a Judicial Internship at the D.C. Superior Court.

Prior to joining Phillips & Associates, Ms. Tubman was an Associate Attorney representing insurance companies and insured persons in labor law, employment law, medical malpractice, and premises liability matters. Ms. Tubman also served as an Assistant District Attorney in the Trial Division and Child Abuse and Sex Crime Bureau of the Bronx County District Attorney’s Office where she gained valuable trial experience.

Ms. Tubman is admitted to practice law in the State of New York.

EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION

Ms. Tubman and our other tenacious attorneys are dedicated to stamping out workplace discrimination. Employment discrimination exists when an employee is treated adversely because of his or her membership in a protected class. Classes that are protected under federal Title VII of the Civil Rights Act include race, color, sex, national origin, and religion. Under Title VII, sex discrimination covers several characteristics that are protected as distinct categories under state and local laws; it includes sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination. You may have a claim, for example, if you were wrongfully terminated because you came out as gay. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is the federal law that prohibits disability discrimination. In general, federal laws enforced by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) prohibit discrimination in workplaces only when they are midsize; for instance, to be covered by Title VII and the ADA, your employer must have at least 15 employees.

In most cases, the New York State Human Rights Law and the New York City Human Rights Law provide more expansive protections to workers. They not only protect a broader range of characteristics, but they also apply to smaller workplaces and define protections more generously.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Sexual harassment exists when an employee is subject to derogatory remarks, touching, groping, insults, and rape. In general, it is categorized into (1) quid pro quo harassment and (2) hostile work environment harassment. Quid pro quo harassment exists when enduring offensive conduct directed towards you because of your sex is a condition of getting or continuing employment.

Hostile work environment occurs when actions are severe or pervasive enough to generate a work environment someone would regard as abusive, hostile or intimidating. Our attorneys, including Ms. Tubman, may be able to pursue damages in connection with offensive actions such as slurs, epithets, offensive jokes, name calling, threats, physical assaults, ridicule, mockery, intimidation, put-downs, insults, interference with work performance, and offensive images.

Harassment can happen in many different circumstances in the workplace including when a harasser is the victim’s supervisor, a supervisor in a different area, an agent of the employer, a coworker, or a nonemployee. The victim need not be someone who was harassed but can be anyone impacted by the offensive behavior. Illegal harassment can happen without you suffering an economic injury such as wage loss.


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