The Families of Holyoke Soldiers Home Victims Reach a $56 Million Settlement

Massachusetts has agreed to pay $56 million to settle a class-action lawsuit brought by the families of veterans who died or became sick after contracting COVID-19 at a state-run veterans’ care center during one of the deadliest outbreaks at a long-term care facility in the U.S., officials said Thursday.

The families of 84 veterans who died during the outbreak at the Holyoke Soldiers’ Home will receive a minimum of $400,000 each, while 84 veterans who contracted the disease and survived will receive a minimum of $10,000 under terms of the settlement that still requires a federal judge’s approval.

“The suit contends that what happened at the Soldiers’ Home was so severe that it rose to the level of a deprivation of the veterans’ constitutional rights to be free from harms recklessly created by the government,” Tom Lesser, one of the families’ attorneys, said in a statement.

Read the source article at Associated Press News

The Wife of a Missouri Pedestrian Killed by a Motorist Wins $10 Million

A woman who hit and killed a pedestrian in Columbia while she was talking on her phone and speeding has been ordered to pay $10 million to the victim’s wife.

Circuit Court Judge Joshua Devine on Wednesday approved the judgment in a wrongful death lawsuit filed against Regine McCraken by Adrienne Siddens, KMIZ-TV reported.

Siddens’ husband, Randall Siddens, was killed on May 5, 2019, when McCracken hit him as he picked up traffic cones while volunteering at a triathlon, police said.

Read the source article at Associated Press News

A Federal Judge Gives Initial Approval to a $180 Million FirstEnergy Settlement

A federal judge has granted preliminary approval to a proposed $180 million settlement between FirstEnergy shareholders and a group of company executives who ran the Akron-based utility during the House Bill 6 scandal.

However, U.S. District Judge Algenon Marbley, the chief judge of the Southern District of Ohio, refused to halt companion settlement cases in the Northern District of Ohio and in Summit County Common Pleas Court. That makes Marbley’s order, issued Monday, only a step towards ending the case, rather than a final resolution of the lawsuit.

“Of course, preliminary approval ‘is only the first step in an extensive and searching judicial process, which may or may not result in final approval of a settlement in this matter,’” wrote Marbley in his order, quoting a ruling in a separate federal case from 2001.

Read the source article at cleveland.com

The Texas AG Announces a $14 Million Settlement With TurboTax

Attorney General Paxton announced a significant settlement against Inuit Inc., who markets the popular product “Turbo Tax.” Texas will receive more than $14 million in restitution for Texas consumers as part of a $141 million multistate settlement, which resolves an investigation begun over two years ago. Nearly  500,000 Texans will benefit from the settlement, whom Intuit misled into purchasing its tax products when they were already eligible to file their taxes for free. Eligible Texas consumers should begin receiving their restitution payments within the next few months.  

This settlement comes on the heels of opioid settlements previously announced by Attorney General Ken Paxton in February 2022, that also widely benefit Texas consumers.  In those settlements, Attorney General Paxton successfully secured over $1.819 billion from the makers and distributors of opioids as well as industry-changing injunctive relief. These landmark settlements will bring funds for much-needed opioid abatement to Texas communities, as well as $75 million of the life-saving, anti-overdose drug, Narcan, to be distributed to Texas first responders and healthcare providers.    

Read the source article at Welcome

The FTC Approves a $69 Million Frontier Internet Settlement

The Federal Trade Commission has approved a $69 million settlement with Frontier Communications over allegations the tech company misrepresented internet service speeds to customers in Riverside and Los Angeles counties, officials said Thursday.

The deal resolves a civil enforcement action alleging deceptive business practices by Frontier in connection with the sale of residential internet services, Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said in a statement.

Frontier does not admit wrongdoing. The settlement requires Frontier to pay nearly $9 million penalties and build up to $60 million worth of fiber optic internet infrastructure in Southern California, the statement said.

Read the source article at Los Angeles and Southern California News

NYC Settles a Wrongful Conviction Lawsuit For $10.5 Million

New York City will pay $10.5 million to settle a federal civil rights lawsuit filed by a man who spent 24 years in prison on a murder conviction that was overturned after a witness who had placed him at the crime scene recanted, city officials said Thursday.

The conviction of Shawn Williams, who was freed in 2018, was the 14th overturned conviction linked to retired Detective Louis Scarcella, a former Brooklyn homicide detective who has been accused of coercing witnesses and framing suspects during the high-crime era of the late 1980s and 1990s.

Williams, who is now 47, was convicted in 1994 in the fatal shooting of his neighbor Marvin Mason the year before.

Read the source article at Insurance Journal

Florida Reaches a $683 Million Opioid Settlement With Walgreens

The Walgreens pharmacy chain has reached a $683 million settlement with the state of Florida in a lawsuit accusing the company of improperly dispensing millions of painkillers that contributed to the opioid crisis, state officials said Thursday.

State Attorney General Ashley Moody said the deal was struck after four weeks of government evidence was presented at trial. Walgreens was the 12th and final defendant to settle with Florida, which will bring in more than $3 billion for the state to tackle opioid addiction and overdoses.

“We now go into battle armed and ready to fight back hard against this manmade crisis,” Moody said at a news conference in Tampa. “I am glad that we have been able to end this monumental litigation and move past the courtroom.”

Read the source article at Associated Press News

NYC Settles For $10.5 Million With a Man Who Was Wrongfully Convicted For Murder

New York City will pay $10.5 million dollars to settle a federal civil rights lawsuit filed by a man who spent 24 years in prison on a murder conviction that was overturned after a witness who had placed him at the crime scene recanted, city officials said Thursday.

The conviction of Shawn Williams, who was freed in 2018, was the 14th overturned conviction linked to retired Detective Louis Scarcella, a former Brooklyn homicide detective who has been accused of coercing witnesses and framing suspects during the high-crime era of the late 1980s and 1990s.

Williams, who is now 47, was convicted in 1994 in the fatal shooting of his neighbor Marvin Mason the year before.

Read the source article at Associated Press News

Washington State Will Receive a $518 Million Opioid Settlement

Three opioid distributors Tuesday announced a $518 million settlement with Washington state. AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson settled following a lawsuit regarding the companies’ alleged role in fueling Washington’s opioid epidemic. Washington agreed to dismiss the current lawsuit upon the settlement becoming effective.

McKesson’s statement reads:

While the companies strongly dispute the allegations made in the plaintiffs’ complaints and during trial, they believe that resolving all of the litigation filed by the State of Washington and its political subdivisions will further the companies’ goal of achieving broad resolution of governmental opioid claims while delivering meaningful relief to communities across the United States that have been impacted by the opioid epidemic.

Read the source article at JURIST

LinkedIn Agrees to a $1.8 Million Pay Discrimination Settlement

Career-networking service LinkedIn has agreed to pay $1.8 million in back wages to almost 700 female workers to settle a pay discrimination complaint brought by U.S. labor investigators.

The U.S. Labor Department announced Tuesday that it reached a settlement agreement with LinkedIn to resolve allegations of “systemic, gender-based pay discrimination” in which women were paid less than men in comparable job roles. 

The settlement affects women who worked in engineering, product or marketing roles from 2015 to 2017 at the company’s offices in San Francisco and Sunnyvale, California. It includes the time before and after Microsoft’s $26.2 billion acquisition of LinkedIn in 2016.

 

Read the source article at CBS News